Manners Monday: What is Etiquette?

Potty Training in restaurant

Photo Credit: Kim­berly Decker

Any­one with chil­dren can tell you that potty train­ing can be stress­ful, espe­cially when leav­ing the house.  You pack extra under­wear, make fre­quent stops at the bath­room, observe your child to see if they are doing the “pee pee dance” but, never ever would I think of tak­ing their port-a-potty with me.

Unfor­tu­nately, not every­one feels the same way.   Case in point.  As reported by Jen­nifer Stagg of KSL 5 News in Utah, “A young mother of twins took potty train­ing to the table — the din­ing table — in a pop­u­lar Utah deli Tues­day. And the pic­ture an onlooker snapped and posted on Face­book has a lot of peo­ple talking.

“If any­one under­stands how stress­ful potty-training can be, it’s mother of three, Kim­berly Decker. In fact, she just fin­ished potty train­ing her lit­tle boy and couldn’t leave her house for sev­eral days dur­ing the process. That’s why she was so shocked at what she wit­nessed Tues­day at the Thanks­giv­ing Point Deli.

“I noticed that this lady was hav­ing her two — she had two twins, two lit­tle girls about 2-and-a-half years old, sit­ting on what I thought were booster seats,” Decker said.

“But after doing a dou­ble take, she real­ized they weren’t booster seats, they were child port-a-potties.”

I thought I would take this time to go over ” What is Eti­quette?” Accord­ing to Emily Post’s Eti­quette Man­ners for a New World:

Eti­quette isn’t a set of “pre­scrip­tions for proper­ness,” but merely the guide­lines for doing things in ways that make peo­ple feel comfortable.

Have a great week everyone.

Manners Monday: Cell Phone Etiquette — Who knew there were manners on the subject

Love them or hate them, cell phones are every­where.  They allow us to watch videos on the go, nav­i­gate us when we are lost, keep our sched­ules and allow us to com­mu­ni­cate with some­one with­out even speak­ing a word.

Along with this great tech­nol­ogy comes a whole new set of social faux pas.  They hap­pen in restau­rants, super­mar­kets and even at work.  And it can hap­pen to any­one.  A cou­ple of weeks ago, Diane Sawyer was wind­ing down her seg­ment with George Stephanopou­los when his cell phone rang.  Here I am speak­ing on this topic:

Here are a few things to keep in mind while using your cell phone:

  1. The per­son you are with should have your FULL attention.
  2. If you need to answer your phone step away from your group, remem­ber the con­ver­sa­tion should be between you and the per­son on the phone.
  3. Keep your con­ver­sa­tions “Kid Friendly.”  You never know who is listening.
  4. When at the mar­ket, if you need to call home and

    con­firm items on the list, keep the con­ver­sa­tion short and sweet.  No one cares how much fun you had, like some­one, don’t like some­one, your day at work, etc.

  5. While wait­ing in line at the bank, mar­ket or depart­ment store, hang up when it is your turn.
  6. No tex­ting at the din­ner table.
  7. Remem­ber par­ents you set the exam­ple.  If you do not respect your fam­i­lies time don’t be upset when your kids are tex­ting at the table or while you are try­ing talk to them.  After all, they only know what they see.

Not every­body feels they have to go with the flow.  Eva Restau­rant in LosAn­ge­les offers a 5% dis­count if you leave your cell phone at the recep­tion desk.  And Alamo Draft­house Cin­ema in Texas has this to say on the subject.

“We have zero tol­er­ance for talk­ing or cell phone use of any kind dur­ing movies, and we aren’t afraid to kick any­one rude enough to start tex­ting their friends dur­ing a show right out of the the­ater.”

Upcoming Workshop — Wine Etiquette: 5 Tips For Enjoying a Glass of Wine

“Wine is bot­tled poetry” — Robert Louis Steven­son 

Although wine is used for reli­gious and cer­e­mo­nial pur­poses, many are intim­i­dated with cer­tain aspects of the total wine experience.
In this 45-minute work­shop we will cover hold­ing the glass to order­ing a bot­tle of wine in a restau­rant and every­thing in-between

Join me for:

Wine Eti­quette: 5 Tips For Enjoy­ing a Glass of Wine

Here are a few of the top­ics that will be covered:

  • Which glass to use and how to hold it
  • Sim­ple wine tast­ing rule
  • Enter­tain­ing: sim­ple rules, guests and hosts
  • Bring­ing a bot­tle to the restaurant

Date: August 23, 2012

Time: 6:30 – 8:00 PM </

span>

Net­work­ing & refresh­ments 6:30

Work­shop begins 7:00

Loca­tion: Checa Chic Bou­tique 3004 Lin­coln Boule­vard Santa Mon­ica, CA 90405

Your Invest­ment: $5.00 and a bot­tle of your favorite wine OR $10.00 without


Reserve your Space Today!

Twitter Etiquette: There’s No Medal for Stupidity

Greek Athlete Voula Papachristou_Social Media EtiquetteVoula Papachris­tou, a Greek triple jumper, has been expelled from the 2012 Olympic Games because of a racist joke she posted on Twit­ter, as well as express­ing sup­port for a far-right polit­i­cal party.

She tweeted “‘With so many Africans in Greece, at least the West Nile mo

squi­toes will eat home made food!”  The Hel­lenic Olympic Com­mit­tee also banned all Greek ath­letes from using social media for per­sonal opin­ions not related to the Olympics and their competitions.

The Greek triple jumper, Voula, has apol­o­gized for her insen­si­tive tweet.  She also apol­o­gized to her fam­ily and her coach.  Unfor­tu­nately, the deci­sion to not let her par­tic­i­pate in the Olympic Games is irre­versible and her dream of bring­ing home the gold is over at least for this olympic season.

Don’t let your dreams slip away because of a com­ment, tweet, or video that you put on the World Wide Web for every­one to see. 

What goes on the Inter­net STAYS there…FOREVER!

Etiquette Guide for the 2012 Olympic Games

The national tourism agency has developed a comprehensive online resource to guide everyone from hoteliers to cab drivers in offering the best customer service and meeting 'cultural' needs.  It offers advice ranging from how to pour wine for Argentinians to not winking at people from Hong Kong. The big no-no is asking a Canadian what part of America they come from.  Exuberant welcome  VisitBritain says the UK is already rated fairly highly - 14th out of 50 - in the Nation Brands Index for the quality of the welcome would-be visitors believe they will get when they come here.  But key competitors such as Canada, Italy, Spain and the Netherlands do better.  Our great landmarks won't be enough to keep tourists happy, say VisitBritain.  The VisitBritain research shows foreign visitors often find Britain's mix of cutting-edge modernity and rich cultural heritage ''fascinating'' and ''exciting.'' They see British people as ''honest,'' ''funny,' ''kind'' and ''efficient'' but in some cases they wish we offered a more exuberant welcome.  The tips have been written by VisitBritain staff, who are natives of the countries featured, and they have a wealth of insight into the places visitors come from. Here is a sample:  · A smiling Japanese person is not necessarily happy  The Japanese tend to smile when angry, embarrassed, sad or disappointed. They may think it rude if you talk to them with your hands in your pockets.  Avoid staring, as eye contact isn't generally considered polite. While sitting, try not to show the bottom of your shoes. Avoid being late for things and blowing your nose in front of someone is also likely to be considered rude.  · Be careful how you pour wine for an Argentinian  The whole process involves a number of social taboos and unless you understand them you could insult someone. For example, pouring wine backwards into a glass indicates hostility. Don't be offended by Argentinian humour, which may mildly attack your clothing or weight.  · Avoid winking at someone from Hong Kong  Winking is often considered a rude gesture. Pointing with an index finger is not advisable as this is generally used only for animals. Point with your hand open. Hong Kong Chinese are very superstitious: mentioning failure, poverty or death risks offence.  · Remember Arabs are not used to being told what to do  Visitors from the United Arab Emirates can take great offence if you appear bossy. They appreciate being looked after by staff who have been trained to understand Arab culture. For example, it is culturally insensitive to ask an Emirati whether they want bacon with their eggs or to include a half bottle of wine with the table d'hote menu.  · Do not be alarmed if South Africans announce that they were held up by robots  To a South African the word robot means traffic lights. ''Takkies'' means trainers, a barbecue is a 'braai', and ''howzit'' is an informal way of saying hello. When in a social situation with a South African do not place your thumb between your forefinger and your second finger - it is an obscene gesture.  · Don't ask a Brazilian personal questions  Steer clear especially of such issues as age, salary, or marriage to someone from Brazil, Argentina's fierce rival.  · Avoid physical contact when first meeting someone from India  Being touched or approached too closely in initial meetings can be considered offensive, even if the intention is entirely innocent or friendly. Be tolerant if Indians at first seem impolite, noisy and impatient. This is partly the result of living in chaotic cities and environments. They usually appreciate orderliness when they see it.  · When meeting Mexicans it is best not to discuss poverty, illegal aliens, earthquakes or their 1845-6 war with America  Polite topics of conversation would be Mexican culture, history, art and museums instead. When demonstrating the height of something, be aware that holding the palm face down is reserved for animals. Burping out loud is considered very rude.  · Never call a Canadian an American  Canadians may take offence if labelled American. Some Canadians get so annoyed about being mistaken for US citizens they identify themselves by wearing a maple leaf as pin badge or as a symbol on their clothing.  · Do not take offence if an Australian or a New Zealander makes a joke about ''Poms''  It is more of a friendly endearment than an intended insult.  · Avoid saying ''thank you'' to a Chinese compliment  Instead, politely deny a compliment to show humility. If you compliment a Chinese person, expect a denial in reply. The Chinese are famous for communicating by "Saying it without saying it." You will have to learn to read between the lines. Use only black and white materials for presentations, as colours have significant meanings in Chinese culture.  · When accepting thanks Koreans will typically say "No, no "  The remark should be interpreted as "You are welcome".  · Don't snap your fingers if you are with a Belgian. It may be interpreted as impolite  And avoid discussing personal matters or linguistic and political divisions within Belgium between Dutch and French speakers.  · Never imply Poles drink excessively  Despite stereotypes, Poles are not large consumers of alcohol and excessive drinking is frowned upon.  Sandie Dawe MBE, Chief Executive Officer of VisitBritain, said: ''Overseas visitors spend more than £16 billion a year in Britain, contributing massively to our economy and supporting jobs across the country.  "So giving our foreign visitors a friendly welcome is absolutely vital to our economy. With hundreds of thousands of people thinking of coming to Britain in the run up to the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2012, this new advice is just one of the ways that VisitBritain is helping the tourism industry care for their customers - wherever they come from.'' If you plan on head­ing to Lon­don for the 2012 Olympic Games here are a few Eti­quette Rules taken from an arti­cle writ­ten by the BBC

The national tourism agency has devel­oped a com­pre­hen­sive online resource to guide every­one from hote­liers to cab dri­vers in offer­ing the best cus­tomer ser­vice and meet­ing ‘cul­tural’ needs.

It offers advice rang­ing from how to pour wine for Argen­tini­ans to not wink­ing at peo­ple from Hong Kong. The big no-no is ask­ing a Cana­dian what part of Amer­ica they come from.

Exu­ber­ant welcome

Visit Britain says the UK is already rated fairly highly — 14th out of 50 — in the Nation Brands Index for the qual­ity of the wel­come would-be vis­i­tors believe they will get when they come here.

But key com­peti­tors such as Canada, Italy, Spain and the Nether­lands do better.

Our great land­marks won’t be enough to keep tourists happy, say Visit Britain.

The Visit Britain research shows for­eign vis­i­tors often find Britain’s mix of cutting-edge moder­nity and rich cul­tural her­itage ”fas­ci­nat­ing” and ”excit­ing.” They see British peo­ple as ”hon­est,” ”funny,’ ”kind” and ”effi­cient” but in some cases they wish we offered a more exu­ber­ant welcome.

The tips have been writ­ten by Visit Britain staff, who are natives of the coun­tries fea­tured, and they have a wealth of insight into the places vis­i­tors come from. Here is a sample:

· A smil­ing Japan­ese per­son is not nec­es­sar­ily happy

The Japan­ese tend to smile when angry, embar­rassed, sad or dis­ap­pointed. They may think it rude if you talk to them with your hands in your pockets.

Avoid star­ing, as eye con­tact isn’t gen­er­ally con­sid­ered polite. While sit­ting, try not to show the bot­tom of your shoes. Avoid being late for things and blow­ing your nose in front of some­one is also likely to be con­sid­ered rude.

· Be care­ful how you pour wine for an Argentinian

The whole process involves a num­ber of social taboos and unless you under­stand them you could insult some­one. For exam­ple, pour­ing wine back­wards into a glass indi­cates hos­til­ity. Don’t be offended by Argen­tin­ian humour, which may mildly attack your cloth­ing or weight.

· Avoid wink­ing at some­one from Hong Kong

Wink­ing is often con­sid­ered a rude ges­ture. Point­ing with an index fin­ger is not advis­able as this is gen­er­ally used only for ani­mals. Point with your hand open. Hong Kong Chi­nese are very super­sti­tious: men­tion­ing fail­ure, poverty or death risks offence.

· Remem­ber Arabs are not used to being told what to do

Vis­i­tors from the United Arab Emi­rates can take great offence if you appear bossy. They appre­ci­ate being looked after by staff who have been trained to under­stand Arab cul­ture. For exam­ple, it is cul­tur­ally insen­si­tive to ask an Emi­rati whether they want bacon with their eggs or to include a half bot­tle of wine with the table d’hote menu.

· Do not be alarmed if South Africans announce that they were held up by robots

To a South African the word robot means traf­fic lights. ”Takkies” means train­ers, a bar­be­cue is a ‘braai’, and ”howzit” is an infor­mal way of say­ing hello. When in a social sit­u­a­tion with a South African do not place your thumb between your fore­fin­ger and your sec­ond fin­ger — it is an obscene gesture.

· Don’t ask a Brazil­ian per­sonal questions

Steer clear espe­cially of such issues as age, salary, or mar­riage to some­one from Brazil, Argentina’s fierce rival.

· Avoid phys­i­cal con­tact when first meet­ing some­one from India

Being touched or approached too closely in ini­tial meet­ings can be con­sid­ered offen­sive, even if the inten­tion is entirely inno­cent or friendly. Be tol­er­ant if Indi­ans at first seem impo­lite, noisy and impa­tient. This is partly the result of liv­ing in chaotic cities and envi­ron­ments. They usu­ally appre­ci­ate order­li­ness when they see it.

· When meet­ing Mex­i­cans it is best not to dis­cuss poverty, ille­gal aliens, earth­quakes or their 1845–6 war with America

Polite top­ics of con­ver­sa­tion would be Mex­i­can cul­ture, his­tory, art and muse­ums instead. When demon­strat­ing the height of some­thing, be aware that hold­ing the palm face down is reserved for ani­mals. Burp­ing out loud is con­sid­ered very rude.

· Never call a Cana­dian an American

Cana­di­ans may take offence if labelled Amer­i­can. Some Cana­di­ans get so annoyed about being mis­taken for US cit­i­zens they iden­tify them­selves by wear­ing a maple leaf as pin badge or as a sym­bol on their clothing.

· Do not take offence if an Aus­tralian or a New Zealan­der makes a joke about ”Poms”

It is more of a friendly endear­ment than an intended insult.

· Avoid say­ing ”thank you” to a Chi­nese compliment

Instead, politely deny a com­pli­ment to show humil­ity. If you com­pli­ment a Chi­nese per­son, expect a denial in reply. The Chi­nese are famous for com­mu­ni­cat­ing by “Say­ing it with­out say­ing it.” You will have to learn to read between the lines. Use only black and white mate­ri­als for pre­sen­ta­tions, as colours have sig­nif­i­cant mean­ings in Chi­nese culture.

· When accept­ing thanks Kore­ans will typ­i­cally say “No, no ”

The remark should be inter­preted as “You are welcome”.

· Don’t snap your fin­gers if you are with a Bel­gian. It may be inter­preted as impolite

And avoid dis­cussing per­sonal mat­ters or lin­guis­tic and polit­i­cal divi­sions within Bel­gium between Dutch and French speakers.

· Never imply Poles drink excessively

Despite stereo­types, Poles are not large con­sumers of alco­hol and exces­sive drink­ing is frowned upon.

Sandie Dawe MBE, Chief Exec­u­tive Offi­cer of Visit Britain, said: ”Over­seas vis­i­tors spend more than £16 bil­lion a year in Britain, con­tribut­ing mas­sively to our econ­omy and sup­port­ing jobs across the country.

“So giv­ing our for­eign vis­i­tors a friendly wel­come is absolutely vital to our econ­omy. With hun­dreds of thou­sands of peo­ple think­ing of com­ing to Britain in the run up to the Olympic and Par­a­lympic Games in 2012, this new advice is just one of the ways that Visit Britain is help­ing the tourism indus­try care for their cus­tomers — wher­ever they come from.” 

arti­cle writ­ten by: BBC


Manners Monday; What would you do: A potential employer asks for your Facebook password?

Shoulder Surfing during an interview_social etiquette

Today’s Mon­day Man­ners Sce­nario has to do with Face­book and a poten­tial new job.

As of May, the unem­ploy­ment rate is 8.2% with Nevada, Rhode Island and Cal­i­for­nia the only three

states whose unem­ploy­ment rates are in the dou­ble dig­its.  After months of send­ing out resumes and inter­view­ing, you finally have a job offer.  When you meet with the hir­ing man­ager to final­ize the details of your deal, the hir­ing man­ager asks you to go to the com­puter and log in to your Face­book account.   This act is com­monly known as “shoul­der surfing.”

Facebook’s offi­cial state­ment is that shoul­der surf­ing “under­mines the pri­vacy expec­ta­tions and the secu­rity of both the user and the user’s friends” and “poten­tially exposes the employer who seeks this access to unan­tic­i­pated legal liability.”

What would you do?

Etiquette Tip — Small Talk Faux Pas

It is hard to believe sum­mer is here.  With the sum­mer get-togethers comes meet­ing new peo­ple and  mak­ing small talk here are some top­ics to stay away from…

  • Inap­pro­pri­ate Subjects:
  • Per­sonal issues such as fam­ily & health
  • Reli­gion
  • Pol­i­tics
  • Salary
  • Inti­mate Relationships
  • Death
  • Sales (Do not try to  sell some­thing to some­one you have just met)
  • Off Color Jokes
  • Gos­sip

Would love to hear your Small Talk Faux Pas stories.

Jules Hirst is a sought after speaker and a rec­og­nized eti­quette
coach.  She con­ducts lec­tures, work­shops, sem­i­nars and webi­na­rs  in busi­ness,
social & wed­ding eti­quette she is also co-author of Power of Civil­ity where she
shares strate­gies and ­tools for build­ing an excep­tional pro­fes­sional
image.
Jules can be reached at: www.juleshirst.com or 310–425‑3160

Caine’s Arcade: What can a 9 year old teach you?

9 year old Caine Mon­roy spent his sum­mer build­ing a card­board arcade at his Dad’s East LA’s used auto part store. His dream was to have lots of cus­tomers visit Caine’s Arcade with lit­tle foot traf­fic his chances were slim, but he never gave up.

Facebook Breakup Etiquette

Facebook Breakup Etiquette-Jules Hirst Etiquette CoachHere is a great arti­cle where 200 teens from the Boston area gath­ered to dis­cuss face­book breakup breakup eti­quette.  Par­ents now would be a great time to enroll your teen, pre-teen in an eti­quette course.… just a thought.

Late last month, 200 teenagers from Boston-area schools gath­ered to dis­cuss the minu­tia of Face­book breakup eti­quette. Should you delete pic­tures of your ex after split­ting up? Is it O.K. to unfriend your last girl­friend if you can’t stop look­ing at her pro­file? And is it ever eth­i­cally defen­si­ble to change your rela­tion­ship sta­tus to sin­gle with­out first noti­fy­ing the per­son whose heart you’re crushing?

These press­ing ado­les­cent ques­tions were part of a one-day con­fer­ence on healthy breakup spon­sored by the Boston Pub­lic Health Com­mis­sion. No one talks to young peo­ple about this aspect of rela­tion­ships, Nicole Daley, one of the con­fer­ence orga­niz­ers, told me between break­out ses­sions as teenagers swarmed a nearby cotton-candy stand. We’re here to change that.

Min­utes later, 15 high-school stu­dents on a sugar high con­vened for a ses­sion on cre­at­ing online bound­aries. The girls out­num­bered the boys, and they didn’t hes­i­tate to gang up on a charm­ing and, until then, immensely well liked 17-year-old named Roberto, who pro­claimed with a bit too much gusto that rac­ing to update your rela­tion­ship sta­tus after a breakup is a healthy behav­ior. That was just one of a hand­ful of sce­nar­ios the teenagers debated and placed into a healthy unhealthy cat­e­gories: oth­ers included post­ing mean/embarrassing sta­tuses about your ex (unhealthy) and rush­ing into a new Face­book offi­cial rela­tion­ship (under­stand­able, but still not healthy).

Roberto, you’re really going to run all the way to your house after school to change your sta­tus? a 16-year-old named Lazangie asked, shak­ing her head. She knows a thing or two about Facebook-related breakups: her last rela­tion­ship ended, she said, because her ex-boyfriend couldn’t han­dle her male friends post­ing niceties on her wall.

When I’m done with a rela­tion­ship, I’m not going to wait a day, an hour or even 10 min­utes to update my sta­tus, Roberto told the group. When it’s over, it’s over. I’m done with you.

The key word here is rac­ing, another girl replied with all the con­de­scen­sion she could muster. Is that really healthy? Break­ing up shouldn’t be a competition!

The group’s adult facil­i­ta­tor who wore a blue Face It, Don’t Face­book It  pin, in a ref­er­ence to the appar­ently trou­bling trend of young peo­ple break­ing up with one another via social media nod­ded in agree­ment and sug­gested that Roberto con­sider tak­ing a tech­nol­ogy time­out the next time he felt com­pelled to race home and pub­licly declare his sin­gle­hood. Roberto reluc­tantly agreed to consider it.

Through­out the one-day meet­ing, orga­niz­ers did their best to make the teenagers for­get they were about to learn some­thing. They were encour­aged to freely use their cell­phones ( note’s the kind of adults who tell you not to use them! An orga­nizer boasted dur­ing the day’s open­ing ses­sion), and breakup-themed songs, like Kelly Clark­son Since U Been Gone, blasted from the main con­fer­ence room’s speak­ers. The pan­der­ing worked: I saw only one teen roll her eyes all day.

To help the young­sters envi­sion what a healthy split might look like, pic­tures and videos of sev­eral celebrity cou­ples who man­aged ami­ca­ble breakups were pro­jected onto a big screen. Justin Tim­ber­lake and Cameron Diaz, for exam­ple, were her­alded as healthy because they’re still friends and were able to co-star in a movie together. Their part­ing was jux­ta­posed with those of Kanye West and Amber Rose (West wrote a mean song about her) and Sammi and Ron­nie from Jer­sey Shore (Sammi sup­pos­edly defriended Ronnie’s friends on her Face­book page), who each exhib­ited the kind of unhealthy breakup behav­ior that the Boston Health Com­mis­sion hopes Mass­a­chu­setts young peo­ple will rise above.

In that pur­suit, orga­niz­ers encour­aged the crowd to eschew part­ing ways over text mes­sage or Face­book, the most com­mon teen breakup meth­ods. (A bisex­ual 15-year-old con­fessed in a morn­ing ses­sion that she learned that her girl­friend of two years had dumped her only when she changed her rela­tion­ship sta­tus to sin­gle.) Atten­dees were advised with mixed results to bravely con­front the awk­ward­ness of face-to-face breakups. When the facil­i­ta­tor in a ses­sion titled Breakups 101 sug­gested that teenagers meet with and come to an agree­ment or mutual under­stand­ing with a soon-to-be ex, a skep­ti­cal 19-year-old nearly leapt out of her chair in protest. So, you’re telling me that you’re cry­ing at night, you’re not sleep­ing, you’re eat­ing all this food to make you feel bet­ter, and you’re sup­posed to just come to an agree­ment?

That sounded like wish­ful think­ing to at least one teenager, who insisted that dat­ing in high school is for suck­ers. Who needs the drama? She said, adding that many peers choose friend­ships or casual sex­ual rela­tion­ships over for­mal roman­tic ones. I’ve got enough prob­lems with­out some stu­pid boy break­ing up with me on Facebook.

Source: The New York Times
Writ­ten by: BENOIT DENIZET-LEWIS

Even The Well-Educated Need Etiquette Lessons

Don’t let this hap­pen to you. Here is a video of a self pro­claimed “well-educated” woman get­ting into an argu­ment with a Metro North Conductor.

The woman boarded the New York bound train last week in West­port, and was appar­ently speak­ing loudly on her cell phone and using pro­fan­ity. When the con­duc­tor asked her to stop using pro­fane lan­guage, the woman replied, “I was not curs­ing. Excuse me, do you know what schools I’ve been to and how well-educated I am?”

Here are a few train eti­quette tips for you to keep in mind the next time you ride the rails to your next destination.

  • Don’t sit in a seat that was not assigned to you.  If it is open seat­ing then pick your seat and do not put your things on the seat next to you.
  • If using your cell phone every­one does not need to hear your con­ver­sa­tion and do not use profanity
  • Avoid eat­ing smelly foods
  • Par­ents con­trol your children
  • Clean up after your­self.  Weather in the bath­room, din­ing car or your seat always put your trash in the trash can.

Remem­ber Eti­quette is mak­ing other peo­ple feel comfortable.