It’s Not Lunch… It’s Business — Dining Etiquette Workshop

 

In the world of busi­ness it is com­mon to con­duct inter­views and/or meet­ings in a pro­fes­sional din­ing setting.

The way you present your­self can either make or break the deal. Empower your­self with the con­fi­dence to land the “per­fect deals over meals.” Join us for a 3 course meal as Jules Mar­tinez Hirst of Eti­quette Con­sult­ing Inc guides us through per­fect­ing Deals over Meals

Top­ics Include:
Host Duties
Guest Duties
Nap­kin Eti­quette
Seat­ing Charts

The Din­ing Expe­ri­ence: Tools of the Table
Amer­i­can vs. Con­ti­nen­tal Styles of Din­ing
Tip­ping Eti­quette
When to Talk Busi­ness
And more.….

Loca­tion:
Eti­quette Con­sult­ing Inc’s Home Office In Mar Vista

Your Invest­ment:
$125.00.00, to reserve your seat click here

Perfecting Deals over Meals Workshop

Dining Etiquette Expert_Jules Martinez Hirst

In the world of busi­ness it is com­mon to con­duct inter­views and/or meet­ings in a pro­fes­sional din­ing setting.

The way you present your­self can either make or break the deal. Empower your­self with the con­fi­dence to land the “per­fect deals over meals.” Join us for a 3 course meal as Jules Mar­tinez Hirst of Eti­quette Con­sult­ing Inc guides us through per­fect­ing Deals over Meals

Top­ics Include:
Host Duties
Guest Duties
Nap­kin Eti­quette
Seat­ing Charts

The Din­ing Expe­ri­ence: Tools of the Table
Amer­i­can vs. Con­ti­nen­tal Styles of Din­ing
Tip­ping Eti­quette
When to Talk Busi­ness
And more.….

Loca­tion:
Stevens Steak and Sea Food House
5332 E. Stevens Place
City of Com­merce, CA 90040

Your Invest­ment:
$35.00, to reserve your seat click here

Spon­sored by:
El Aviso

About the Pre­sen­ter:
Jules Mar­tinez Hirst is a sought after eti­quette expert and co-author of the Power of Civil­ity and is ded­i­cated to empow­er­ing indi­vid­u­als with con­fi­dence and essen­tial social grace.

She has worked with cor­po­ra­tions such as Northrop Grum­man, Ernst & Young, County of Los Ange­les Libraries and uni­ver­si­ties includ­ing UCLA Ander­son, USC, UC Davis, Mount Saint Mary’s.

Jules has been inter­viewed by a vari­ety of media out­lets includ­ing NBC Nightly News, ABC World News, Good Morn­ing Amer­ica, Bravo TV, KNX 1070.

Business Etiquette: Should a Senator eat ribs with the President?

Today I had the priv­i­lege of speak­ing to reporter Adriene Hill of the Maket­place on man­ners and the busi­ness meal, along with the audio clip that aired ear­lier today on KCRW  we dis­cussed “Should a Sen­a­tor eat ribs with the Pres­i­dent?  Well… not quite we dis­cussed Busi­ness Meals, she also wrote the fol­low­ing.  Enjoy.

Buesiness Meals dos and donts

*Pres­i­dent Obama isn’t just sit­ting at con­fer­ence tables with Repub­li­cans in Con­gress these days, he’s sit­ting down at the din­ner table. In fact, this week he dined with a group of sen­a­tors for a busi­ness din­ner to dis­cuss the budget.

Now, a busi­ness din­ner is an oppor­tu­nity to get to know each other, to talk busi­ness in a social set­ting, to make an impres­sion. But as any­one who’s sat down for one of these meals knows, there’s all that food on the table. How do you avoid botch­ing lunch? Marketplace’s Adriene Hill met up with Jules Hirst of Eti­quette Con­sult­ing, Inc. for a one-on-one lesson.

  1. Always fol­low your host’s lead.  Put your nap­kin in your lap after they put their nap­kin in their lap.  Order food in the same price range as the food that they order.
  2. The fold of your nap­kin should go toward you.
  3. Order a food that is easy to eat.  Ribs are a bad choice.
  4. Eat before you go out to lunch.  You don’t want to scarf your food dur­ing the inter­view or meet­ing.  You want the focus to be on the con­ver­sa­tion, not the food.
  5. If your host orders alco­hol, you may order alco­hol.  But know your­self well enough to know whether or not it’s a good idea to drink it.
  6. Wait until your host starts to eat before you start to eat.
  7. If your host asks a ques­tion just as you take a bite of food, politely indi­cate with your fin­gers that you will talk as soon as you have swallowed.
  8. Don’t cor­rect some­one else’s man­ners at the table.
  9. If you have called the meet­ing, you should pay.  Instead of wait­ing for the bill to come to the table, step away to the restroom, hand your credit card to the wait­staff and ask them to add a 20 per­cent tip.
  10. Write a thank you note.

About the author

Adriene Hill is a mul­ti­me­dia reporter for the Mar­ket­place sus­tain­abil­ity desk, with a focus on con­sumer issues and the indi­vid­ual rela­tion­ship to sus­tain­abil­ity and the environment.
*source: marketplace.org
*written by: Adriene Hill

Etiquette for Dinner Parties

Here is a great video by Australia’s top enter­tain­ing experts reveal­ing their din­ner party suc­cess secrets.Dinner party etiquette

*Fifty years ago there were clear eti­quette rules. For exam­ple, don’t remove your sports coat or smoke your pipe around women, and never dis­cuss per­sonal affairs in pub­lic. But things have changed.

Today, peo­ple air their dirty laun­dry on Twit­ter and the sexes are rel­a­tively equal in rela­tion­ships and business.

You can no longer be sure whether you’ll be scoffed at or thanked for open­ing a door for a woman.

But that doesn’t mean man­ners have no place in the mod­ern world – in fact, if you want to make a good impres­sion, eti­quette is still the best way.

 

* Writ­ten by: Fiona MacDonald

e-Book 10 Things to Remember at the Dinner Table

Eat­ing in any social set­ting may result in mishaps. Sign up today and receive our FREE e-Book “10 Things to Remem­ber at the Din­ning Table.“

These tips are taken from our eBook “A Guide to Nav­i­gat­ing the Din­ner Table Graciously.”

10 Things to Remeber at the Dinner Table

Use the fol­low­ing tips to steer your­self out of com­mon mishaps that can occur at the din­ner table.

Sim­ply enter your name and email and after con­firm­ing your sub­scrip­tion, you will receive your e-Book “10 Things to Remem­ber at the Din­ner Table” for imme­di­ate download.

* indi­cates required


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You will also receive addi­tional eti­quette tips and be the first to know of any upcom­ing events and promotions.

Your pri­vacy is impor­tant to us. We will not SELL, RENT or GIVE your name or email address to anyone.

Manners Monday: Family Meals are More than Teachable Moments

Family Day_Family Meals... Making the most of dinnerDur­ing my Bring­ing Man­ners Home work­shop, I uti­lize teach­able moments for par­ents to teach their chil­dren man­ners at home.  Dur­ing the mod­ule “Fam­ily Meals: Table Man­ners for Kids, Teens and Adults,” we cover proper uten­sil place­ment, table con­ver­sa­tion, how to prop­erly hold your uten­sils (after all, if  you, the par­ent, hold them like gar­den tools what do you think your chil­dren are going to do? ) and the dif­fer­ence between din­ing out and din­ing at home.  We also cover spend­ing time dis­cussing the events of the day.

Did you know that teens who have fre­quent fam­ily din­ners (five to seven per week) are more likely to report hav­ing excel­lent rela­tion­ships with their par­ents.  Also, teens who have excel­lent rela­tion­ships with their par­ents are less likely to use mar­i­juana, alco­hol or tobacco.

This comes from CASACo­lum­bia and The National Cen­ter on Addic­tion and Sub­stance Abuse at Colum­bia Uni­ver­sity, who in 2001 launched Fam­ily DayA Day to Eat Din­ner with Your Chil­dren.TM  It is cel­e­brated on the 4th Mon­day in Sep­tem­ber — which is today, Sep­tem­ber 24th!  This is a day to remind par­ents that fre­quent fam­ily din­ners make a difference!

Now I under­stand for most fam­i­lies it takes two incomes to sur­vive, or, if you are a sin­gle par­ent, you may not be home in time for din­ner.   That was my strug­gle.  I was a sin­gle mom for 13 years and the hard­est thing after dri­ving home in traf­fic for two hours was leav­ing my road rage and office pol­i­tics at the door and giv­ing my girls 100% of my atten­tion, but I knew what­ever time I had with them had to be qual­ity time.

Make time each week to have din­ner with your fam­ily.  Not only will your kids learn good man­ners and develop social skills that will enhance their self– con­fi­dence, but they will also be less likely to smoke, drink or use drugs.

Go to CASACo­lum­bia and take the pledge to become a STAR fam­ily. S-Spend time with my kids by hav­ing din­ner together. T –Talk to them about their friends, inter­ests and the dan­gers of drugs and alco­hol.  A — Answer their ques­tions and lis­ten to what they say.  R — Rec­og­nize that I have the power to help keep my kids sub­stance free!

Happy Fam­ily Day!!

Upcoming Events: Finishing School For the 21st Century Dining & Social Etiquette for Children

Man­ners are a lost art in today’s soci­ety because chil­dren are spend­ing more and more time in front of their tele­vi­sions and their com­put­ers and los­ing out on social inter­ac­tion. What these youths do not know is that good man­ners are a skill that can pro­vide an advan­tage in the busi­ness world as well as in their daily life.

Some of the top­ics cov­ered in social eti­quette include:

  • Pre­sen­ta­tion Skills
  • First Impressions/Appearance
  • Body lan­guage
  • Intro­duc­tions and handshakes
  • Please, Thank You and Excuse Me
  • Tele­phone skills
  • Thank you notes

Some of the top­ics cov­ered in Din­ing Eti­quette include:

  • For­mal table settings
  • Pos­ture at the table
  • Proper table talk
  • Menus and order­ing meals
  • Nap­kins
  • Dif­fi­cult to eat foods
  • Din­ing do’s and don’ts

This two week class meets every Mon­day begin­ning August 13th.  The last ses­sion will be held at a local restau­rant where the stu­dents can prac­tice every­thing they have learned while enjoy­ing a hosted lunch.  Classes are inter­ac­tive and are taught using role-playing exer­cises. Stu­dents will receive a hand­book con­tain­ing the lessons for the course that they may keep and use to help rein­force the proper social behav­ior, self-respect and self-confidence that they will take away from the class – while hav­ing fun & mak­ing new friends.

Dates: August 13, 2012
             August 20, 2012
Time: 1:00 – 2:30pm
Age
: 7–13
Loca­tion: Checa Chic Bou­tique 3004 Lin­coln Blvd Santa Mon­ica, CA 90405
Your Invest­ment: $140.00 per stu­dent, $120.00 for sib­lings must be booked at the same time.

To see our upcom­ing Din­ing and Social Eti­quette for Teens visit Din­ing & Social Eti­quette for Teens Sum­mer Course

Lim­ited to 10 students

****last class will be held at a restau­rant details will be given at the first class

About the Pre­sen­ter, Jules Hirst:

Jules Hirst, Etiquette Expert

Eti­quette Expert Jules Hirst  pres­i­dent of Eti­quette Con­sult­ing, Inc. She offers work­shops on a vari­ety of busi­ness, social and din­ing eti­quette top­ics and is a con­tribut­ing author of The Power of Civil­ity. Jules has been inter­viewed by and quoted in a vari­ety of media includ­ing NBC Nightly News, San Diego Tri­bune, Yahoo Shine, The Smart Show and Women’s Online Mag­a­zine.  Visit her webiste @ www.juleshirst.com. Tweet her @Etiquette411

Business Etiquette: Mastering Meal Time Interviews

You applied for a job, made it through a cou­ple of inter­views and now they want to take you and may­be the final can­di­dates to lunch.  Are your table man­ners up to par?  If the posi­tion you are apply­ing for requires you to wine and dine with clients chances are they are tak­ing you to lunch to check out your table eti­quette.

Your typ­i­cal inter­view may include:

1. Lis­ten­ing to the inter­viewer
2. Answer­ing his/her ques­tions
3. Ask­ing intel­li­gent ques­tions
4. Appear­ing relaxed

Now, throw in a two or three course meal, well this can get messy.  Although meal inter­views may seem less for­mal they are just as impor­tant.  Dur­ing a meal inter­view you are being eval­u­ated on your social and table eti­quette among other things.

In order to sur­pass at a meal inter­view not only do you need to remem­ber your basic table man­ners (which fork to use, nap­kin goes on your lap, which is your bread plate, etc.) remem­ber the fol­low­ing as well;

  • Try to avoid food that is messy such as spaghetti or ribs
  • Avoid food that is heavy on gar­lic or onions…you don’t bad breath
  • Avoid alco­hol
  • Although your meal is more than likely free, you should not order the most expen­sive meal.  The gen­eral guide­line is to fol­low the inter­view­ers lead and order the same as the inter­viewer, if that is not an option then stay close to the price of the meal the inter­viewer ordered
  • Fol­low your host do not begin eat­ing or drink­ing any­thing not even water until your host does
  • The inter­viewer should never eat alone, if they order cof­fee or dessert, then so should you
  • Never offer to pay for the meal
  • Remem­ber to thank the inter­viewer for the meal and you may men­tion a pos­i­tive com­ment on the meal
  • Never ask for a doggy bag
  • Don’t for­get to express how much you enjoyed talk­ing to the inter­viewer and ask what the next step is
  • Send a thank you note within 24 hours

If you are up against oth­ers with equal qual­i­fi­ca­tions, table man­ners can be the decid­ing fac­tor if you are hired or not.

Jules Hirst is a sought after speaker and a rec­og­nized eti­quette coach.  She con­ducts lec­tures, work­shops, sem­i­nars and webi­na­rs in busi­ness and social eti­quette.  Jules co-author Power of Civil­ity where she shares strate­gies and tools for build­ing an excep­tional pro­fes­sional image.

Jules can be reached at: www.juleshirst.com or 310–425‑3160

Upcoming Events: Modern Day Finishing School For the 21st Century For Teens — Summer Course

Teen Manner Class

Man­ners are a lost art in today’s soci­ety because chil­dren are spend­ing more and more time in front of their tele­vi­sions and their com­put­ers and los­ing out on social inter­ac­tion. What these teens do not know is that good man­ners are a skill that can pro­vide an advan­tage in the busi­ness world as well as in their daily life.

We meet every Mon­day for 2weeks

Some of the top­ics cov­ered in social eti­quette include:

  • Pre­sen­ta­tion Skills
  • First Impressions/Appearance
  • Body lan­guage
  • Intro­duc­tions and handshakes
  • Please, Thank You and Excuse Me
  • Tele­phone skills
  • Thank you notes

Some of the top­ics cov­ered in Din­ing Eti­quette include:

  • For­mal table settings
  • Pos­ture at the table
  • Proper table talk
  • Menus and order­ing meals
  • Nap­kins
  • Dif­fi­cult to eat foods
  • Din­ing do’s and don’ts

This two week class meets every Mon­day begin­ning August 13th.  The last ses­sion will be held at a local restau­rant where the stu­dents can prac­tice every­thing they have learned while enjoy­ing a hosted lunch.  Classes are inter­ac­tive and are taught using role-playing exer­cises. Stu­dents will receive a hand­book con­tain­ing the lessons for the course that they may keep and use to help rein­force the proper social behav­ior, self-respect and self-confidence that they will take away from the class – while hav­ing fun & mak­ing new friends.

Dates Mon­day August 13, 2012

               Mon­day August 20, 2012

 Time:  3:00 – 4:30pm (14–17) Age

Ages: 14–17

Loca­tion: Checa Chic Bou­tique 3004 Lin­coln Blvd Santa Mon­ica, CA 90405

Your Invest­ment: $140.00 per stu­dent, $120.00 for sib­lings.  To book sib­lings and receive the dis­count, send an email request­ing the dis­count.  Do not pur­chase through Eventbrite.

Lim­ited to 10 students

 

****last class will be held at a restau­rant details will be given at the first class

 

About the Pre­sen­ter, Jules Hirst:

Jules Hirst, Etiquette Expert

Eti­quette Expert Jules Hirst pres­i­dent of Eti­quette Con­sult­ing, Inc. She offers work­shops on a vari­ety of busi­ness, social and din­ing eti­quette top­ics and is a con­tribut­ing author of The Power of Civil­ity. Jules has been inter­viewed by and quoted in a vari­ety of media includ­ing NBC Nightly News, San Diego Tri­bune, Yahoo Shine, The Smart Show and Women’s Online Mag­a­zine. Visit her webiste @ www.juleshirst.com. Tweet her @Etiquette411<

Upcoming Events: Mastering Table Manners

Etiquette Consulting Inc - Mastering Table manners

Sum­mer is filled with fam­ily din­ners, wed­dings, grad­u­a­tions and bbqs.  Do you find your­self still ask­ing, “Which is my bread plate?” or “Which fork do I use?”If you answered yes to either of these ques­tions, don’t worry, you can pol­ish your din­ing skills by attend­ing “Mas­ter­ing Your Table Manners.”

This course will teach you the rules of appro­pri­ate social and din­ing etiquette.

Mas­ter­ing Your Table Man­ners is a 90 minute course that gives you the con­fi­dence to Mas­ter that next din­ner party.

Here are a few of the top­ics that will be covered:

¨Appro­pri­ate table conversation

¨Nap­kin Use

¨Amer­i­can vs. Con­ti­nen­tal Styles

¨Din­ing Do’s and Don’ts

¨Dif­fi­cult to eat foods

¨Dis­tress­ing Meal­time Moments

Date: June 21, 2012

Time: 6:30 – 8:30 PM
Net­work­ing & refresh­ments 6:30 – 6:50
Work­shop begins 7:00

Loca­tion: Checa Chic Bou­tique
3004 Lin­coln Boule­vard Santa Mon­ica, CA 90405

Your Invest­ment: $25.00